Acting

The Senior Lecturer in the Department of Drama and Theatre Arts at the University of Birmingham, Rose Whyman, provides an introduction to the various approaches to acting. Whyman explores the development of drama and acting processes, from the use of rhetoric in Ancient Greece to Konstantin Stanislavsky’s Method, and details the differences between an actor representing an emotion and experiencing emotion.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Anton Chekhov

Rhonda Blair, Professor in the Division of Theatre at the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, provides an overview of the life of Russian playwright and short story writer Anton Chekhov. Blair considers how Chekhov’s plays capture the complexity and richness of human experience, affirming his place as one of the most influential writers of European theatre.
Digital Theatre
(2017)
Concise Introduction

August Strindberg

The Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, Laurence Senelick, provides an introduction to Swedish dramatist August Strindberg (1849-1912). Senelick considers how Strindberg’s personal experience directly influenced his work and highlights how he intensely explored the complexities of the ego, providing an alternative approach to conventional stage behaviour with the ever-changing personalities of his characters.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Australian Theatre

Peta Tait, Professor of Theatre and Drama at La Trobe University in Melbourne, provides an introduction to Australian theatre. Referring to key practitioners who have impacted Australia’s theatrical landscape, Tait considers how explorations of Aboriginal culture and postcolonial concepts have developed into two distinctive modes of performance which incorporate aspects of Australia’s multicultural society in the 21st century.
Digital Theatre
(2017)
Concise Introduction

Catharsis

Independent Scholar Tobin Nellhaus provides an introduction to catharsis - a term associated with Aristotle’s definition of tragedy and the purgation of emotions. Nellhaus explores various interpretations of catharsis and considers how the relationship it draws between the play, the audience and a particular set of emotions, such as fear and pity, has developed significantly over time.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Circus

Peta Tait, Professor of Theatre and Drama at La Trobe University, Melbourne, provides an introduction to the history, theory and practice of the circus. Referring to influential practitioners, significant female performers and contemporary circus companies, Tait considers how the circus continues to amaze audiences around the world with extraordinary physical stunts and evocative acrobatic action.
Digital Theatre
(2017)
Concise Introduction

Erwin Piscator

Laurence Senelick, Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, provides an overview of one of the most significant directors of Weimar Germany, Erwin Piscator (1893-1966). Senelick explores the similarities and differences between Piscator’s and Bertolt Brecht’s approaches to epic theatre and considers how his scenographic and dramatic innovations in the service of revolutionary Marxism gave power to political theatre of the 1920s.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Henry Irving

Robert Leach, Former Reader in Drama and Theatre at the University of Birmingham, provides an introduction to the first British actor to be knighted, Sir Henry Irving (1838-1905). Leach explores Irving’s success as artistic director of the Lyceum Theatre in London and considers how its repertoire was built around Irving’s own acting strengths, which focused on psychologically complex characters in splendid theatrical settings.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Léon Bakst

Laurence Senelick, Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, provides an introduction to the Russian painter, illustrator and designer, Léon Bakst (1866-1924). Senelick details Bakst’s success from co-founding the World of Art group to his revolutionary work with the Ballet Russes which popularised exoticism in scenery and costume design.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Maurice Maeterlinck

The Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, Laurence Senelick, introduces the work of Belgian playwright Maurice Maeterlinck. Senelick explores the characteristics of Maeterlinck’s writing, focusing on his fascination with silence, death and anguish and exemplifies how his plays have significantly influenced European drama over the last century, from the symbolists to the absurdists and beyond.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Pantomime

Robert Leach, Former Reader in Drama and Theatre at the University of Birmingham, provides an overview of British pantomime. Leach explores the form’s dramatic development, from the use of Commedia inspired characters and Harlequinade to the introduction of the Dame, and highlights how pantomime raises questions of gender, social stability and the problem of illusion and reality in theatre.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

Russian Theatre

Robert Leach, Former Reader in Drama and Theatre at the University of Birmingham, provides an overview of Russian theatre. Covering history, theory and practice, Leach explores the various methods by some of Russia’s leading theatrical practitioners, such as Konstantin Stanislavsky and Vsevolod Meyerhold, and examines the development of realist and anti-realist theatre during the 20th century.
Digital Theatre
(2017)
Concise Introduction

Practical Workshop Guide | Frankenstein

The aim of this Digital Theatre+ Practical Workshop Guide is to deepen and enrich understanding of the play as a blueprint for performance, encouraging the student to approach the material using the investigative and interpretive methods of the actor, director or voice coach.
Digital Theatre
(2016)
Practical Guide

Vasily Toporkov

Laurence Senelick, the Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, introduces the Russian actor Vasily Toporkov (1889-1970), who published a detailed account of his experience working with Konstantin Stanislavsky. Senelick considers the importance of Toporkov’s theoretical work on the interpretation and popularisation of Stanislavsky’s Method of Physical Action and his theory on the art of acting.
Digital Theatre
(2018)
Concise Introduction

A Doll's House

Digital Theatre+ Study Guides are specially commissioned from leading theatre academics and practitioners, with expert knowledge of the texts that they explore. The guides examine plays from literary and contextual, as well as dramatic perspectives, to provide a thorough and manifold access point to key texts, from the classical to the contemporary.
Digital Theatre
(2013)
Study Guide

A Doll's House

Plays Through Practice guides look at interpretative choices and include exercises for developing directing, design and acting skills, as well as full and clear background information. They also suggest, where necessary, preliminary practical work that can be undertaken before beginning work on the text.
DramaWorks
(2016)
Practical Guide

About the Production: Far from the Madding Crowd

How do you take a 40,000 word classic novel and transform it into a piece for the stage? Join the director, writer, composer and actors as they reveal how they took Thomas Hardy's classic Far from the Madding Crowd and made it work on the stage.

Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
Digital Theatre
(2012)
Documentary

Approaches to Unseen Text

Learning how to approach a previously unseen text can be a daunting task. This guide aims to give a thorough grounding in guiding students through the processes of recognition, understanding, evaluating and analysis of an unseen text, as well as practical approaches to getting creative responses down on paper in a clear and constructive manner.
DramaWorks
(2016)
Practical Guide

Comedy

Comedy is, by its nature, highly contextual, it must constantly adapt to changes in the cultural milieu in which it works. Comedy also relies on newness and surprise more heavily than other art forms – some jokes just aren’t funny after the first or second time one hears them. As a result, new forms and styles emerge constantly, just as older forms fall out of favour and are abandoned.
Digital Theatre
(2016)
Concise Introduction

Dramaturgy

In contemporary theatrical practice, “dramaturgy” can refer to either the structure, themes, goals, and conventions of a piece of dramatic literature, or to the aesthetic approach taken by a creative team to transform a script into a live performance. The dramaturg’s task is to consider how the artistic choices made by the creative team in the process of production might enhance the philosophical, political, or aesthetic goals of the event.
Digital Theatre
(2016)
Concise Introduction

George Bernard Shaw

Theatre Director and the Creative Associate at Gate Theatre, Ed Madden, introduces the work of Irish playwright and Nobel Prize Winner George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950). Madden considers how Shaw’s plays aimed to interrogate serious moral and political ideas which were informed by his socialist politics and details the influence of Henrik Ibsen, particularly on work which explores the role of women.
Digital Theatre
Concise Introduction

Henrik Ibsen - at a glance

Ibsen was born in 1828, into a wealthy family. Ibsen’s elder brother had died several weeks after his own birth. He was born into a house that was suffering a loss; in addition, the affluence that the family enjoyed soon disappeared. By the time Ibsen was six the family was bankrupt.
Digital Theatre
Biography

Konstantin Stanislavsky

Konstantin Sergeyevich Alekseyev, who took the stage name ‘Stanislavsky’, was a Russian actor and director who lived from 1863-1938. He is famous throughout the world today for the development of a method of training actors called the ‘System’ and because of the standards of performance established at the theatre he founded in 1897 with Vladimir Nemirovich-Danchenko, which became known as the Moscow Art Theatre (MAT).
Digital Theatre
(2016)
Concise Introduction

Lady Windermere's Fan

Plays Through Practice guides look at interpretative choices and include exercises for developing directing, design and acting skills, as well as full and clear background information. They also suggest, where necessary, preliminary practical work that can be undertaken before beginning work on the text.
DramaWorks
(2015)
Practical Guide

Melodrama

Melodrama was the dominant dramatic form of the nineteenth century, c. 1810-1860, having grown out of Gothic drama. The French revolution’s iconic moment – the storming of the Bastille (1789) – provided Gothic drama with its most potent image: the castle as prison to be broken open. Melodrama repudiated literature: it was a genre of performance.
Digital Theatre
(2016)
Concise Introduction