Edith Craig

Robert Leach, Former Reader in Drama and Theatre at the University of Birmingham, outlines the work of British theatre director, producer, costumier and pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement, Edith Craig (1869-1947). Leach details Craig’s key productions with the Pioneer Players and considers how her experimental approach aimed to make audiences think, question and see humane solutions to problems.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2018)

Edward Albee

Theatre Director and Creative Associate at Gate Theatre, Ed Madden, presents the history, aims and methods of the one of the greatest American dramatists, Edward Albee. Madden provides an in-depth analysis of Albee’s works, including Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and explores their concern with exposing the darkness, delusion and desperation that lie behind the façade of contemporary life.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Erwin Piscator

Laurence Senelick, Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University, provides an overview of one of the most significant directors of Weimar Germany, Erwin Piscator (1893-1966). Senelick explores the similarities and differences between Piscator’s and Bertolt Brecht’s approaches to epic theatre and considers how his scenographic and dramatic innovations in the service of revolutionary Marxism gave power to political theatre of the 1920s.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2018)

Eugene O'Neill

Ed Madden, Theatre Director and Creative Associate at Gate Theatre, provides an overview of the life and works of multi-award winning playwright Eugene O’Neill. Madden explores how O’Neill’s methods, such as the use of naturalism and expressionism in his plays, have impacted American drama, affirming his place as one of the most important and influential dramatists of the 20th century.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Eugenio Barba

Adam J. Ledger, Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham’s Department of Drama and Theatre Arts, introduces the internationally renowned director Eugenio Barba. Ledger details Barba’s role in the development of Odin Teatret and considers his interest in creating a theatre that changes perceptions and forges connections with audiences and communities.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Edward Bond

Michael Patterson, Emeritus Professor of Theatre at De Montfort University, Leicester, provides an introduction to British playwright Edward Bond. Patterson explores Bond’s well-known plays, such as Lear and Saved, and considers how the use of violence throughout his work has led to him becoming one of the most controversial and important dramatists of the 21st century. Contains adult content.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Edward Gordon Craig

Edward Gordon Craig (1872-1966) is known as one of the twentieth century’s most influential theatre theorists and makers; he was also a trained actor. The broad scope of ‘theatre maker’, albeit not a term Craig would have used himself, aptly captures how his ideas on the fusion of ‘technical stagecrafts’ (conventionally seen as set construction, stage management, lighting and sound) and ‘creative stagecrafts’ (acting, music, literature, and dance) inform approaches to directing and anticipate collaborative models of authorship.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Epic Theatre

In the early 20th century Bertolt Brecht and his contemporaries sought to establish a radical dramaturgy for a new political theatre. Epic theatre, as described by Brecht, evinces particular qualities: firstly, it is episodically structured and may follow multiple plotlines simultaneously; secondly, it is presentational, making no attempt to generate any illusion of authenticity; thirdly, it is not driven by the choices of individual characters, but important political and moral ideas; and fourthly, it is designed to provoke a thoughtful, intellectual response to moral and political problems, not an emotional one.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2016)

Eugene O'Neill - at a glance

Eugene Gladstone O’Neill was born on Broadway, the heart of New York’s theatreland, in 1888, while his actor father was on tour in a show. The young Eugene spent his first seven years with his parents on tour, and this itinerant theatrical lifestyle seemed to imbue his life with a sense of rootlessness, and a desire for somewhere to call home.
Biography

Exploring Physical Theatre

All theatre is, by its very nature, physical - so what has the term 'Physical Theatre' evolved to mean as a specific concept? The style of theatre wherein the actors' bodies are priviledged supreme importance, far more so than one might see in Naturalistic Theatre, for example, is a constantly evolving discipline. It has been through many noted incarnations, from Mime to Meyerhold and beyond, and this guide seeks to put that physical process into practical perspective.
DramaWorks
(2015)
Practical Guide