Caryl Churchill

Ed Madden, Theatre Director and Creative Associate at Gate Theatre, introduces British playwright Caryl Churchill. Madden explores Churchill’s works in-depth and considers how her experimentation with language, the collaborative process with Joint Stock and the strong political and feminist content of her work has led her to become one of the greatest living dramatists in the UK.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Catharsis

Independent Scholar Tobin Nellhaus provides an introduction to catharsis - a term associated with Aristotle’s definition of tragedy and the purgation of emotions. Nellhaus explores various interpretations of catharsis and considers how the relationship it draws between the play, the audience and a particular set of emotions, such as fear and pity, has developed significantly over time.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2018)

Christopher Marlowe

The Associate Professor of Dramatic Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz, Michael M. Chemers, provides an overview of British 16th-century playwright Christopher Marlowe. Chemers explores some of Marlowe's most popular works, including Edward II and Doctor Faustus, and considers how he became one of the most celebrated tragedians during a time of vibrant theatrical activity in London.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Circus

Peta Tait, Professor of Theatre and Drama at La Trobe University, Melbourne, provides an introduction to the history, theory and practice of the circus. Referring to influential practitioners, significant female performers and contemporary circus companies, Tait considers how the circus continues to amaze audiences around the world with extraordinary physical stunts and evocative acrobatic action.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Commedia Dell'arte

Author John Rudlin provides an introduction to commedia dell’arte, a form of theatre popular in Europe from the 16th to the 18th century. Rudlin lists the stock characters and masks which are central to the form that originated in Italy and considers the criticism and controversy surrounding commedia’s engagement with political figures and events of the time.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2017)

Classical Tragedy

The term Tragedy refers to a theatrical practice that emerged in Ancient Greece, involving highly sophisticated dramas with serious themes, the scripts of which remain popular all over the world. The significance of Tragedy to theatre history owes much to The Poetics of Aristotle, a book of dramaturgy, theatre history, and play analysis, stating that Tragedies are designed to produce eleos (empathy) and phobos (fear).
Encyclopedia Entry
(2016)

Comedy

Comedy is, by its nature, highly contextual, it must constantly adapt to changes in the cultural milieu in which it works. Comedy also relies on newness and surprise more heavily than other art forms – some jokes just aren’t funny after the first or second time one hears them. As a result, new forms and styles emerge constantly, just as older forms fall out of favour and are abandoned.
Encyclopedia Entry
(2016)

Comparing Comedy: Love's Labour's Lost and Much Ado About Nothing

The world-famous Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon is custodian of all things Shakespeare and a comprehensive source of knowledge. Digital Theatre+ commissioned them to create a Comparing Comedy guide to accompany our Shakespeare's Globe Collection production of Love's Labour's Lost, to enable students to compare and contrast this production with its partner play, Much Ado About Nothing.
Essay
(2015)